A Healthy Baby In a Healthy World: Baby’s Immunizations

Your little bundle of joy is two months old and, as you already know, it is time for the baby’s immunizations to start. This moment arrives with a lot of questions and  worries for the parents due to all the information in the media, which are often wrong and paranoid. The most common questions that we have in mind are:vaccin-bebelus-hexacima-600x336

What Do Baby’s Immunizations Represent?

Immunization is the safest way to protect your child from diseases. It also helps  reduce the spread of disease and prevents epidemics. Most of them are in the form of injections. They are sometimes called vaccines or vaccinations.

How Does the Immunization Work?

Usually, when you get vaccinated, you receive a small part of weakened or dead organisms that cause the disease. This amount is not enough to cause disease itself, but it is enough to boost your immune system to produce antibodies that can recognize and attack the microbe, if the baby will ever be exposed to it.Sometimes a vaccine does not prevent the disease entirely, but it will make it much easier for the body to fight against it when the situation occurs. Some immunizations are required only once. Others require several doses over time.imunizare-vaccin-nou-nascut-820x300

What Could Be The Side Effects After The Injection?

Adverse reactions to the vaccine are divided into three categories: local ,systemic and allergic.                              Local reactions are generally the least severe and most common.The most common type of adverse reactions are local reactions such as pain, edema (swelling) and redness at the injection site. Local reactions can occur in almost 80% of vaccine doses, depending on the type of vaccine.Generally, local reactions  are usually less severe and self-limiting. In rare cases, local reactions may be severe or very exaggerated. These are called hypersensitivity reactions, although there are no allergic reactions, as indicated by the term. These reactions are also known Arthus reactions and are found most often in the tetanus and diphtheria toxin. It is believed that the Arthus type reactions are due to very high antibody titers, typically caused by too many doses of the toxin.p_15112_766x350-10-85

Systemic  reactions are more generalized events and include fever, malaise, myalgia (muscle pain), headache, lack of appetite and others. These symptoms are common and non-specific.

Allergic reactions are the most severe and less frequent side effects.Severe allergic reactions can be life-threatening. Fortunately, these reactions are rare, occurrence rate is below 1 per million doses.They include difficulty in breathing, hoarse voice, wheezing, hives, paleness, weakness, accelerated heart beat, dizziness and sore throat. If the reaction is treated immediately, the baby will recover fully.

Doctors and nurses who perform immunizations know what to do in case of allergic reactions.

Before the vaccine, the doctor will check the child’s health history and all previous immunizations.

If you are concerned about any of the reactions that your baby might develop after the vaccine, talk to your doctor, practice nurse or health adviser!images

Immunisations at 2 Months:

DTaP/IPV/Hib vaccine
It helps protect against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib).

Pneumococcal vaccine (PCV)
Provides some protection against a form of bacterial meningitis caused by the pneumococcal bacteria, as well as other conditions such as severe ear infections and pneumonia caused by pneumococcal bacteria.

Rotavirus vaccine
Helps protect against rota-virus, an infection that causes severe diarrhea and vomiting in babies and young children.

MenB vaccineLab_confirmed_cases_of_meningococcal_disease_in_the_UK_-column_chart-regularwebinline-300x287
Helps protect against meningitis and septicemia caused by meningococcal type B bacteria.This new vaccine, to help protect against meningococcal type B bacteria, has been added to the routine immunizations offered to babies born since 1st May 2015. The Men B vaccine is given at the 2, 4 and 12 months visits. Adding the MenB to the routine visits, simplifies the schedule and reduces the number of appointments parents have to make. The change is intended to provide earlier protection and less distress to the child than multiple appointments.

Immunisations at 3 months:

DTaP/IPV/Hib vaccine
Helps protect against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenza type B (Hib).

MenC vaccine
Helps protect against meningitis and septicemia.

Rotavirus vaccine
Helps protect against rotavirus, an infection that causes severe diarrhea and vomiting in babies and young children.vaccinare1

 

Immunisations at 4 Months:

DTaP/IPV/Hib vaccine
Helps protect against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenza type B (Hib).

Pneumococcal vaccine (PCV)
Provides some protection against a form of bacterial meningitis caused by pneumococcal bacteria, as well as other conditions such as severe ear infections and pneumonia caused by pneumococcal bacteria.

MenB vaccine
Helps protect against meningitis and septicemia caused by meningococcal type B bacteria.

Immunizations between 12 and 13 Months – within a month of the first birthday:

Hib/MenC vaccine
Helps protect against Hib and meningitis C infections.

MMR vaccine
Helps protect against measles, mumps and rubella.

Pneumococcal vaccine (PCV)
Provides some protection against a form of bacterial meningitis caused by pneumococcal bacteria, as well as other conditions such as severe ear infections and pneumonia caused by pneumococcal bacteria.

MenB vaccine
Helps protect against meningitis and septicemia caused by meningococcal type B bacteria.

Non-routine Immunizations:

BCG vaccine
Usually offered to babies who are more likely to come into contact with someone with tuberculosis (TB).

Hepatitis B vaccine 
Offered to any baby whose mother or close family has been infected with hepatitis B.

Flu                                                                                                                                                                                                               Children with underlying medical conditions are offered an annual flu vaccine from 6 months of age. All children aged 2 and older are offered a nasal spray flu vaccine every year.copii-fructe

Tips for Parents

As you can see, there are a few vaccines, a few challenges, that your little baby has to face. But remember after a few tears, with your help, he will forget everything.

  • after vaccination your baby needs a big cuddle
  • to relieve the pain(also if you deal with fever), give your baby paracetamol(your GP will prescribe this for you)
  • make sure that the clothes are not to tight on him and are not rubbing the injection area
  • if the baby has fever make sure that he doesn’t wear too many clothes
  • make sure you have the optimal temperature in the house, not too hot
  • give the baby more fluids to drink
  • apply cold water compresses on the injection area-this  helps reduce the swelling and the local painhealthy-happy-family-2

I hope my article helps you, concerned parents! Tomorrow, I have my 12 months immunization for my baby, I’m very nervous, because now he is a big boy and he understands everything. Probably I will cry in the same time with him but after the procedure I will make sure he gets extra love and attention!

So,wish me luck and don’t forget :IF WE WANT A HEALTHY WORLD,WE NEED TO KEEP OUR KIDS HEALTHY!

    1. Alina & Clara June 23, 2016

    Add Your Comment